The dreaded storage lurgy...Condensation

AirCon

Resident Thermodynamics / Electronics specialist
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I will get a Skylift at some point, they look the business as does the bike I should add.
You need a smooth hard floor to get the best from them.
 
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bridgland

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You need a smooth hard floor t get the best from them.
Totally agree and had to look for floor tiles that provided grip as well as a decent level of smoothness. The floor tiles have a little texture to the surface, rather than the ones you can get that are the checker plate style.
 
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Fight the streets Fmd

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I posted these photos on my intro thread, as someone mentioned that I did the shed specifically for the bike, which is true. The shed is foil bubble wrap lined and then panelled on the inside. It stays at 12 degrees C minimum all year round, plus I do my 3D printing of parts up there too, which helps keep the warmth going.

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Bit of free labour too😇
 

AirCon

Resident Thermodynamics / Electronics specialist
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Not free....I had to pay them both and they are not cheap to motivate!
I've always fancied a 3D printer (and a Drone... my spell check just changed that to CLONE :ROFLMAO:... that would be a lot of line/ink).
What do you actually print.... every time I look on line people are making ornaments.

I've a customer at a famous Film Studio near by that makes amazing space craft and aliens etc....
I think there machine was millions, the environmental controls were about £75K (50% humidity and 25°C).
 

bridgland

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I've always fancied a 3D printer (and a Drone... my spell check just changed that to CLONE :ROFLMAO:... that would be a lot of line/ink).
What do you actually print.... every time I look on line people are making ornaments.

I've a customer at a famous Film Studio near by that makes amazing space craft and aliens etc....
I think there machine was millions, the environmental controls were about £75K (50% humidity and 25°C).
I am printing unobtainable 851 and 888 parts right now. The more fun part is learning CAD imaging to make the parts in the first place.
 

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AirCon

Resident Thermodynamics / Electronics specialist
Subscriber
I am printing unobtainable 851 and 888 parts right now. The more fun part is learning CAD imaging to make the parts in the first place.
Cool.... I noticed that a lot of people make a little bit of money (around £1) selling CAD files suitable for these machines.
Someone did a bung for the Mutley swinging arm, to keep the mud out of the rear hub.

Can you print "rubbery" flexible parts... as that's what those in the second picture look like?
 

bridgland

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Cool.... I noticed that a lot of people make a little bit of money (around £1) selling CAD files suitable for these machines.
Someone did a bung for the Mutley swinging arm, to keep the mud out of the rear hub.

Can you print "rubbery" flexible parts... as that's what those in the second picture look like?
Yes I can. It is a material called TPE. All I need is an example of the part, even if damaged and I create a CAD image to print from. I generally don’t sell the CAD as it takes so long to create the images, but I do sell cheap.
 

Exige

Elite Member
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Yes I can. It is a material called TPE. All I need is an example of the part, even if damaged and I create a CAD image to print from. I generally don’t sell the CAD as it takes so long to create the images, but I do sell cheap.
Thermoplastic Elastomer:

TPE.png
 

Robarano

Elite Member
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The garage doesn;t really suffer from it having insulated walls and the plastic floor matting. I do turn the radiators on for short periods to take the chill off once a week or so, in the really cold weather.
 

MartinJ

New member
I have a pitched roof brick garage. Used to be terribly damp. To keep the heat in I put OSB3 board up for the ceiling (painted white) then lagged between above it between the joists, just like in your loft. Boarded it for storage and stuck a loft hatch in. There is airflow in the rood void so no condensation above.
Invested insome insulated roll shutter doors.
I got the bare conrete epoxy painted to keep down the dust and damp. Was brilliant but I didn't ask for grit/pumice in the floor, so it looked amazing but was a skating ring with wet shoes. So plan B, I then put down some eco tiles. They are great, floor isn't so cold. In strategic places I've inset 3mm 400x400 aluminium plates for anything that is seriously heavy.
Then installed 3 small tube heaters on the walls. On the coldest day the garage is still a tropical 5C to 6C. I have a glazed side door and made a shallow box to fit into the window. Painted the inside black, cut three holes in the bottom and three at the top. When the sun hits it the box acts like a heater, you can feel the heat 50cm away. Inside it gets up to 40C when outside is 1C - just need more sunshine!!
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Expat Jack

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Damn you and your statistics. You have just made me buy a hygrometer so I can check my garage. Not got a problem but curiosity gets the better of me (again). 🙂
Humidity range between 45 - 57.
Lowest temperature (overnight) 7.5 degrees. External low temp same time 2 degrees.

I previously measured low temp over winter so far and the coldest it has been was 5.5 degrees.

In the garage is our boiler. Plus washing machine, tumble drier and drain cover. Humidity level included spell when washing machine was running and discharging into drain.

Roller insulated door, brick built, painted floor and attached.
 

bridgland

Member
Subscriber
Cool.... I noticed that a lot of people make a little bit of money (around £1) selling CAD files suitable for these machines.
Someone did a bung for the Mutley swinging arm, to keep the mud out of the rear hub.

Can you print "rubbery" flexible parts... as that's what those in the second picture look like?
The printer I am currently using is one of the Kickstarter investment ones. It had a few issues at first, but seems to be going strong now. It is called a Snapmaker 2.0, but also does laser engraving and basic CNC routing (Link - Snapmaker) and is under £2,000, but you can get basic 3D Printers for as little as a £300 to £400. The big commercial ones that even do metal printing start at around £40,000, so you need to have a business to make those work.
 
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sev

Well-known member
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a decent DMLS setup will set you back the wrong side of 100k with a decent enough bed to work on and a purge tank and sealed working section so that you can print Ti and mag. It's a bit like a decent welding setup, you have basic and intermediate stuff not that far apart in price and then it just goes mental for the the full fat grown up stuff.

We used to have one in our place together with the SLS and SLA machines.

I've got to say @bridgland the snapmaker looks interesting. It might come in handy for me when making patterns for composite moulds, and I like the idea of basic cnc capability.
 
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